In Greenland, I felt temperatures up to 50 percent warmer than historical norms, witnessed receding glaciers, and walked on vast expanses full of slush. What we do in our ephemeral lives has eternal impact on the planet and on future generations. We are all connected. Thus, how we live impacts Greenland. And what happens to Greenland ultimately happens to all of us.

– Roger Fishman

Taking to the skies to capture Greenland from above, Roger Fishman created the largest fine art collection of the island’s extreme remote beauty, entitled Ephemeral & Eternal: Greenland. Collaborating with scientists from various prestigious American universities and hoping to activate the public by unveiling the magnificence of the land, Roger’s photographs reveal what is at stake and what we must work to preserve for the future of our planet.

GREENLAND PREPARATION

In July 2018 and 2019, Roger flew in a helicopter above the icy waters of Greenland to capture his exquisite collection. But this journey first required a 4.5-hour helicopter ride from Reykjavík, Iceland to Kulusuk, Greenland over the Denmark Strait with nothing but open water below. In preparation for this extreme flight, Roger was required to take a HUET (Helicopter Underwater Escape Training) certification class, which is typically mandatory for oil rig workers and helicopter pilots that work offshore. The training class focused on how to survive if a controlled landing or uncontrolled helicopter crash would take place over the open water. During the flight, Roger needed to wear a survival suit, which protects your entire body from hypothermia in the event of being immersed in freezing water.

GREENLAND FROM ABOVE

Photographing Greenland from an aerial perspective, Roger set out to create the largest fine art collection of the island, displaying its splendor that not many in the world have had the opportunity to see. To engage the viewer, he brought forth a different way to see the landscapes and glaciers by shooting straight down from the helicopter with the H6D-100c, an HCD 35-90mm lens, and a Kenyan gyro for stabilization. “This eliminates context and, thus, requires the person to use their imagination and their emotions to see with their heart,” explains Roger. Planning with his pilot to get the ideal shots, they would fly in tight, sharp circles 2 to 3 times before flying out and repeating the process.

By revealing Greenland’s beauty to a wider audience, Roger hopes that his images will activate the public, making them fall in love with this magical place they perhaps have not seen before. Even further, he hopes that his images will promote “the need to be active in voting for politicians and policies that protect our environment, and to be spending time and money with companies that have products with sustainable manufacturing policies and by-products. As well as to simply fall in love with the gift of life and mother earth,” says Roger.

Collaborating with scientists from American universities like MIT, UCLA, Columbia, and the University of Buffalo, Roger’s images helped add to their research about Greenland and its changing landscape.

The H6D is simply amazing in terms of color and detail. And Greenland has tremendous color, textures and layers and all types of designs. The H6D really allows you to create a visual story that immerses your senses…almost as if you can touch the narwhals and be with me on the expedition. Plus, the 100MP sensor provides an exceptional dynamic range of 15 stops, which really allows me to capture the wide range of beauty that Greenland has to offer.

ABOUT ROGER FISHMAN

After many years of an office job working in corporate America, adventurer and activist Roger Fishman finally decided to follow his true passion and made traveling and photography his full-time work. With a focus on photographing the environment, giving a voice to wildlife and mother earth herself through aerial photography, Roger hopes to inspire others to take a more active stance in the future of our planet. See more from his collection here.

CAPTURE EVERY LAST DETAIL

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