Preserving Hasselblad History with the H6D-400c MS

The ROSS HK-7 represents the genesis of the Hasselblad name as a camera manufacturer. One hundred years before the HK-7, Victor Hasselblad’s predecessors established the family name as a distributor of photographic goods and chemicals in the Southern port town of Gothenburg, Sweden. As multiple branches around the country were opened offering photo processing, the Hasselblad name became increasingly synonymous with photography. Amidst World War II, the Swedish government approached Victor with the task of replicating a recovered German aerial camera. Rumor has it that his humble but ambitious response was simply, “No, but I can make a better one.” In the spring of 1940, Victor organized a group of skilled experts inside the shed of an automobile factory in Gothenburg under the name “Ross Incorporated.” Shortly after, these skilled experts would be considered the first generation of the Hasselblad brand.

Produced from 1941 to 1943, a total of 240 HK-7 units were produced, measuring 31x26x17.6cm and weighing 4.8 kilograms with a 13.5cm (135mm) lens attached. The camera featured a basic set of shutter speeds from 1/150 of a second to 1/400 of a second, with the shutter placed behind the lens. The camera produced a 7x9cm image, revolutionary for the era as other models featured lesser precise technology. By improving the mechanics and precision of the camera, aerial photographs could be captured with significantly improved reliability and accuracy. To this day, Hasselblad continues to offer aerial photographic solutions, albeit now with high resolution digital sensors. The A6D-100c features a 100MP CMOS sensor and compatibility with both fixed wing and UAV aircrafts.

Used to document the HK-7 is the Hasselblad H6D-400c Multi-Shot, the latest generation of the company’s legendary Multi-Shot technology. First pioneered in the early days of digital imaging, Multi-Shot imaging has become a widely accepted technique for cultural heritage institutions globally. Capable of producing a 400 megapixel image file, the 400c MS captures every detail and nuance of historic artifacts with incredibly accurate detail and information. This resolution is achieved by way of a precision-movement that shifts the sensor by single and half pixel movements capturing 6 separate images, allowing for precise color and detail fidelity to be captured. These images are then merged together via Hasselblad software in order to produce a stunning photograph suitable for preserving priceless artifacts such as the HK-7.


Dominique Provost

Preserving Pedro de Mena’s 17th Century Sculptures

with the Multi-Shot

Using the Hasselblad Multi-Shot system, Dominique Provost had the opportunity to photograph Spanish baroque sculptor Pedro de Mena’s collection of six hyper-realistic 17th century sculptures. These photographs will be of monumental importance for art conservation, future restoration, digitalization, and if necessary, reproduction of these historical pieces.

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Roger Fishman

Narwhals, Icebergs, and the Extreme Landscapes of Greenland

Taking to the skies to capture Greenland from above, Roger Fishman created the largest fine art collection of the island’s extreme remote beauty, entitled Ephemeral & Eternal: Greenland. Collaborating with scientists and hoping to activate the public, Roger’s photographs reveal what is at stake and what we must work to preserve for the future of our planet.

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Roman Jehanno

Portraits of the Incredible Craftspeople of Peru

Finding himself amidst the most incredible craftspeople from Lima to Cusco to Puno, Roman Jehanno traveled across Peru to capture stunning portraits of various artisans, farmers, bakers, and more. Roman’s Peruvian portraits captured with the H6D-100c help to preserve and spread cultural awareness about the lives and work of so many talented, hidden artists.

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Julien Tell

Highsnobiety x Versace

on the H6D-100c

Fashion photographer Julien Tell, in-house photographer at Highsnobiety – the expert on all things trending within fashion, music, and entertainment – put the H6D-100c to use when shooting their latest collaboration with Versace, giving results that brought the vibrant clothing pieces and dynamically curated floral arrangements to life.

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Tom Oldham

Silent Street Portraits with the XCD 45P

Hasselblad H System photographer Tom Oldham was one of the first in the world to put the new XCD 45P lens, the world’s lightest digital medium format autofocus lens on the market today, to the test in the low winter light of London.

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Daniel Rueda & Anna Devís

Pink A Boo: A Visual Game of Hide-and-Seek Inside La Muralla Roja

Within the pastel pink and blue walls of Spain's La Muralla Roja, Daniel Rueda and Anna Devís staged a visual game of hide-and-seek. In our interview with the duo, they share their entire process behind the concept and execution of their project within the dreamlike maze.

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Unimatic Watches

Capturing the Details of Timepieces Unseen by the Naked Eye

Testing out the H6D-100c and HC Macro 120mm to capture their newest timepieces, we spoke to Unimatic Watches co-founder Simone Nunziato, who told us all about the outstanding capabilities of using the H System to carry out the extremely difficult task of photographing watches and all their minuscule details.

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Ruairidh Mcglynn

The Cruel Beauty of Winter in the Scottish Highlands

Seeking out the winter storms of the Scottish Highlands, Ruairidh McGlynn ventured into rain, sleet and snow in weather as cold as -15°C (5°F) with the X1D and XCD 45, where he was intrigued to capture the cruel beauty of the area’s intense conditions, seeing the Highlands from a fresh, snowy perspective.

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